• Oli Mora

Review - Emma. (2020)

Updated: May 26

Emma. tells the well-known story of a young girl who meddles in the love life of the people around her. Based on the novel by Jane Austen, this crowd-pleasing comedy revolves around the charming yet selfish Emma Woodstone.

Really, there is no better way to put this- Emma. is one of the easiest films to enjoy that has come to us from the past few months. While the script is nothing to write home about, the production design, makeup, hair styling, score, costumes, acting, and above all cinematography bring this newest adaptation together nicely.

Emma. is shot digitally, so it loses some of that realistic look that comes with movies shot using film, but it also makes the visual aspect more pleasant to view, as what's happening on screen appears cleaner and smother with reduced noise. It is a film that is beautifully framed and lighted, and for so long it was all I could think about while watching it. "What a beautiful shot" was my entire thought process throughout the 124 minute run-time.

In addition, the production design, hair styling, makeup, and costumes make the film very pleasant to look at.

Taking place in the 1800s, of course, their was the challenge of having the actors speak as if they were in that time period. They do, however, a fantastic job of making this come off naturally. Their line delivery and physical movements make the setting believable. These people are walking and talking like someone might in the 1800s.

The script, however, is a little more problematic. While the dialogue is just fine and the pacing is not bad, the character development for some of the people in the film is slightly sub-par. This is especially true for Emma herself. By the end of the film, I felt as though I still didn't know who she was. She was as familiar to me at the end as she was at the beginning of the film. Possibly, this lack of development could have been screenwriter Eleanor Catton and director Autumn de Wilde's attempt of making the character mysterious and unpredictable, and while they did pull both of those off, she also begins to feel like a stranger.

Besides that, however, Emma. is a ridiculously easy film to enjoy and a is fun time for children and adults alike.

Here at The CinemaScope, we recommend this picture.


B+

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©2020 by Oli Mora and Tobi Liberman / ©2020 The CinemaScope